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Table 3 Hypothesis testing by known group comparison

From: Measurement properties of the Danish version of the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer (ABC) measure

  Group 1
Blue-collar workers (n = 16)
Group 2
Non-medical academics
(n = 21)
Group 3
GP’s and oncologists
(n = 19)
p-valuea
  % (n) % (n) % (n)  
Hypothesis: Group 2 > group 1
 Awareness of unexplained bleeding 81.3 (13) 61.9 (13) - - 0.285
Hypothesis: Group 2 > group 1
 Being too busy to make time to go to the doctorb 12.5 (2) 47.6 (10) - - 0.035
Hypothesis: Group 2 > group 1
 Awareness of having a close relative with cancerc 62.5 (10) 81.0 (17) - - 0.274
Hypothesis: Group 2 > group 1
 Awareness of getting sunburnt more than once as a childc 56.3 (9) 71.4 (15)    0.489
Hypothesis: Group 3 > group 2
 Awareness of a sore that does not heal - - 52.4 (11) 100 (19) 0.001
Hypothesis: Group 3 > group 2
 Correctly identifying the 5-year survival from ovarian cancerd - - 9.5 (2) 57.9 (11) 0.002
Hypothesis: Group 3 > group 2
 Correctly identifying that cancer risk is higher in people aged 70-years than at a younger age - - 71.4 (15) 94.7 (18) 0.095
Hypothesis: Group 3 > group 2
 Awareness of infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) c - - 47.6 (10) 100 (19) 0.000
  1. aFischer’s exact test. Statistical significance, italics p-value < 0.05
  2. bResponse options were yes often, yes sometimes and no, which were dichotomised into yes/no
  3. cResponse options were strongly disagree, tend to disagree, tend to agree and strongly agree, which were dichotomised into disagree/agree
  4. dFor ovarian cancer an answer of 3 or 4 out of 10 was coded as correct