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Study design

This section considers manuscripts that investigate how choices of research methodology and study design can impact study results, including research participation and study outcomes.

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  1. The study describes the methodological challenges encountered in an observational study estimating the effectiveness of colonoscopy in reducing colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality.

    Authors: Binu J Jacob, Rinku Sutradhar, Rahim Moineddin, Nancy N Baxter and David R Urbach

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013 13:59

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  2. Using covariance or mean estimates from previous data introduces randomness into each power value in a power curve. Creating confidence intervals about the power estimates improves study planning by allowing s...

    Authors: Matthew J Gribbin, Yueh-Yun Chi, Paul W Stewart and Keith E Muller

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013 13:57

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  3. The role of the clinical nurse/midwife specialist and advanced nurse/midwife practitioner is complex not least because of the diversity in how the roles are operationalised across health settings and within mu...

    Authors: Joan G Lalor, Dympna Casey, Naomi Elliott, Imelda Coyne, Catherine Comiskey, Agnes Higgins, Kathy Murphy, Declan Devane and Cecily Begley

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013 13:55

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  4. The editors of BMC Medical Research Methodology would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in Volume 12 (2012).

    Authors: Adrian Aldcroft

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013 13:45

    Content type: Reviewer acknowledgement

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  5. Scoping studies are increasingly common for broadly searching the literature on a specific topic, yet researchers lack an agreed-upon definition of and framework for the methodology. In 2005, Arksey and O’Mall...

    Authors: Helena ML Daudt, Catherine van Mossel and Samantha J Scott

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013 13:48

    Content type: Debate

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  6. Telephone surveys based on samples of landline telephone numbers are widely used to measure the prevalence of health risk behaviours such as smoking, drug use and alcohol consumption. An increasing number of h...

    Authors: Michael Livingston, Paul Dietze, Jason Ferris, Darren Pennay, Linda Hayes and Simon Lenton

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013 13:41

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  7. Longitudinal qualitative methods are becoming increasingly used in the health service research, but the method and challenges particular to health care settings are not well described in the literature.We refl...

    Authors: Lynn Calman, Lisa Brunton and Alex Molassiotis

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013 13:14

    Content type: Correspondence

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  8. Efficient HIV prevention requires accurate identification of individuals with risky sexual behaviour. However, self-reported data from sexual behaviour surveys are prone to social desirability bias (SDB). Audi...

    Authors: Roxanne Beauclair, Fei Meng, Nele Deprez, Marleen Temmerman, Alex Welte, Niel Hens and Wim Delva

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013 13:11

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  9. Treatment burden can be defined as the self-care practices that patients with chronic illness must perform to respond to the requirements of their healthcare providers, as well as the impact that these practic...

    Authors: Katie Gallacher, Bhautesh Jani, Deborah Morrison, Sara Macdonald, David Blane, Patricia Erwin, Carl R May, Victor M Montori, David T Eton, Fiona Smith, David G Batty and Frances S Mair

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013 13:10

    Content type: Correspondence

    Published on:

    The Erratum to this article has been published in BMC Medical Research Methodology 2014 13:160

  10. Systematic reviews provide clinical practice recommendations that are based on evaluation of primary evidence. When systematic reviews with the same aims have different conclusions, it is difficult to ascertai...

    Authors: Cherie Wells, Gregory S Kolt, Paul Marshall, Bridget Hill and Andrea Bialocerkowski

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013 13:7

    Content type: Research article

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  11. Participant attrition in longitudinal studies can introduce systematic bias, favoring participants who return for follow-up, and increase the likelihood that those with complications will be underestimated. Ou...

    Authors: Janey C Peterson, Paul A Pirraglia, Martin T Wells and Mary E Charlson

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:178

    Content type: Research article

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  12. In Australia telephone surveys have been the method of choice for ongoing jurisdictional population health surveys. Although it was estimated in 2011 that nearly 20% of the Australian population were mobile-on...

    Authors: Margo L Barr, Jason J van Ritten, David G Steel and Sarah V Thackway

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:177

    Content type: Research article

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  13. In Evidence-Based Medicine, clinical practice guidelines and systematic reviews are crucial devices for medical practitioners in making clinical decision. Clinical practice guidelines are systematically develo...

    Authors: Miew Keen Choong and Guy Tsafnat

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:176

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  14. Variation in counts between subjects at a given speed or work rate are the most important source of error in physical activity (PA) measurements with accelerometers. The aim of this study was to explore how th...

    Authors: Eivind Aadland and Jostein Steene-Johannessen

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:172

    Content type: Research article

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  15. Use of the Internet to conduct randomised controlled trials is increasing, and provides potential to increase equity of access to medical research, increase the generalisability of trial results and decrease t...

    Authors: Erin Mathieu, Alexandra Barratt, Stacy M Carter and Gro Jamtvedt

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:162

    Content type: Research article

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  16. This paper discusses whether baseline demographic, socio-economic, health variables, length of follow-up and method of contacting the participants predict non-response to the invitation for a second assessment...

    Authors: Anne M May, Lotte E Adema, Dora Romaguera, Anne-Claire Vergnaud, Antonio Agudo, Ulf Ekelund, Annika Steffen, Philippos Orfanos, Nadia Slimani, Sabina Rinaldi, Traci Mouw, Sabine Rohrmann, Silke Hermann, Heiner Boeing, Manuela M Bergmann, Marianne Uhre Jakobsen…

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:148

    Content type: Research article

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  17. Although the outcomes of health promotion and prevention programmes may depend on the level of intervention, studies and trials often fail to take it into account. The objective of this work was to develop a f...

    Authors: Karine Legrand, Emilie Bonsergent, Clotilde Latarche, Fabienne Empereur, Jean François Collin, Edith Lecomte, Evelyne Aptel, Nathalie Thilly and Serge Briançon

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:146

    Content type: Correspondence

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  18. Information from blood cultures is utilized for infection control, public health surveillance, and clinical outcome research. This information can be enriched by physicians’ assessments of positive blood cultu...

    Authors: Kim O Gradel, Jenny Dahl Knudsen, Magnus Arpi, Christian Østergaard, Henrik C Schønheyder and Mette Søgaard

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:139

    Content type: Research article

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  19. Despite growing support for mixed methods approaches we still have little systematic knowledge about the consequences of combining surveys and focus groups. While the methodological aspects of questionnaire su...

    Authors: Benedicte Carlsen and Claire Glenton

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:134

    Content type: Debate

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  20. Verbal autopsy has been widely used to estimate causes of death in settings with inadequate vital registries, but little is known about its validity. This analysis was part of Addis Ababa Mortality Surveillanc...

    Authors: Awoke Misganaw, Damen Haile Mariam, Tekebash Araya and Aderaw Aneneh

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:130

    Content type: Research article

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  21. A knowledge synthesis attempts to summarize all pertinent studies on a specific question, can improve the understanding of inconsistencies in diverse evidence, and can identify gaps in research evidence to def...

    Authors: Monika Kastner, Andrea C Tricco, Charlene Soobiah, Erin Lillie, Laure Perrier, Tanya Horsley, Vivian Welch, Elise Cogo, Jesmin Antony and Sharon E Straus

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:114

    Content type: Study protocol

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  22. The UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (UK CHIC) is an observational study that collates data on HIV-positive adults accessing HIV clinical care at (currently) 13 large clinics in the UK but does not collect pregnanc...

    Authors: Susie E Huntington, Loveleen K Bansi, Claire Thorne, Jane Anderson, Marie-Louise Newell, Graham P Taylor, Deenan Pillay, Teresa Hill, Pat A Tookey and Caroline A Sabin

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012 12:110

    Content type: Research article

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