Skip to main content

Articles

Page 46 of 46

  1. Published formulas for case-control designs provide sample sizes required to determine that a given disease-exposure odds ratio is significantly different from one, adjusting for a potential confounder and pos...

    Authors: Michael D Edwardes

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2001 1:11

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  2. Although a randomized trial represents the most rigorous method of evaluating a medical intervention, some interventions would be extremely difficult to evaluate using this study design. One alternative, an ob...

    Authors: Stuart G Baker, Karen S Lindeman and Barnett S Kramer

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2001 1:9

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  3. We would expect information on adverse drug reactions in randomised clinical trials to be easily retrievable from specific searches of electronic databases. However, complete retrieval of such information may ...

    Authors: Sheena Derry, Yoon Kong Loke and Jeffrey K Aronson

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2001 1:7

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  4. Many randomized trials involve measuring a continuous outcome - such as pain, body weight or blood pressure - at baseline and after treatment. In this paper, I compare four possibilities for how such trials ca...

    Authors: Andrew J Vickers

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2001 1:6

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  5. In order to assess the usefulness of radiolabeled white cell scanning in the diagnosis of intestinal inflammation, subjects were asked to rank several dimensions of preference for white cell scanning in relati...

    Authors: Richard L Nelson, Alan Schwartz and Dan Pavel

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2001 1:5

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  6. We examined whether quarterly patient enrollment in a large multicenter clinical trials group could be modeled in terms of predictors including time parameters (such as long-term trends and seasonality), the e...

    Authors: Anna-Bettina Haidich and John PA Ioannidis

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2001 1:4

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  7. Guidelines published in major medical journals are very influential in determining clinical practice. It would be essential to evaluate whether conflicts of interests are disclosed in these publications. We ev...

    Authors: George N Papanikolaou, Maria S Baltogianni, Despina G Contopoulos-Ioannidis, Anna-Bettina Haidich, Ioannis A Giannakakis and John PA Ioannidis

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2001 1:3

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  8. To comprehend the results of a randomized controlled trial (RCT), readers must understand its design, conduct, analysis and interpretation. That goal can only be achieved through complete transparency from aut...

    Authors: David Moher, Kenneth F Schulz and Douglas G Altman

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2001 1:2

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  9. Meta-analysis usually restricts the information pooled, for instance using only randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. This neglects other types of high quality information. This review explores ...

    Authors: Lesley A Smith, R Andrew Moore, Henry J McQuay and David Gavaghan

    Citation: BMC Medical Research Methodology 2001 1:1

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

2019 Journal Metrics