Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 1 Diagnostic dilemma submitted to 1st year medical students.

From: Interpretation of evidence in data by untrained medical students: a scenario-based study

You are on call at the emergency room. A patient arrives, Mr. Fender, who aches all over. You suspect, among other diseases, an acute ravepartitis. You know that the Hendrix test can orient you as to the presence of this disease. This test consists in having the patient listen to "Star spangled banner" played by Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock in 1969, at 100 dB, and in counting the number of seconds until the patient screams and covers his/her ears. Large studies, based on thousands of observations, have shown that people who have and have not this disease are distributed as follows, according to the Hendrix test (only one version shown):
  Version A Version B Version C Version D
Hendrix test (seconds) Ravepartitis absent (%) Ravepartitis present (%) Ravepartitis absent (%) Ravepartitis present (%) Ravepartitis absent (%) Ravepartitis present (%) Ravepartitis absent (%) Ravepartitis present (%)
0-10 0 87 0 15 1 87 0 87
11-20 0 11 3 40 3 11 0 11
21-30 4 1 8 32 4 1 8 1
31-60 21 1 36 11 21 1 36 1
61 or more 75 0 53 2 71 0 56 0
Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
  1. You administer this test to Mr. Fender who starts to scream after 25 seconds. Is this result an argument for or against the diagnosis of ravepartitis? For/Against/Neither for nor against