Skip to main content

Table 4 Maximum variation sampling

From: The use of purposeful sampling in a qualitative evidence synthesis: A worked example on sexual adjustment to a cancer trajectory

  Walker ( 2011) + Hanly (2014) Gilbert (2010) + Fergus (2002) Juraskova (2003) + Hartman (2014)
struggling Having a sense of loss
+
Anger, depression

Grieving about sexual changes
Altered body image
+
Identity struggle

Sexual changes as biographical disruption
Reduced vaginal lubrication
+
loss of libido

Sexual dysfunctions
Exacerbation of struggling Avoiding communication about the sexual changes
+
Minimization of side effects

Denial as one of the grief stages
Sticking to a coital imperative
+
Flaunting sexual prowess despite erectile function

Following hegemonic discourses of sexuality
Receiving radiotherapy combined with external radiation and brachytherapy
+
unpredictability of the side-effects

Characteristics of the cancer treatment
Sexual adjustment Accepting the decision to stop sexuality
+
Accepting sexual changes

Acceptance of sexual changes
Renegociating the practices of sexual intimacy
+
Redefinition of what sexuality means

Sexual rediscovery
Sexual adjustment and quality of life
+
Using Viagra leads to sex similar to before cancer

Sexual recovery
Line of arguments = Sexual adjustment as a grieving process = Sexual adjustment as a cognitive restructuring process = Sexual adjustment as a rehabilitation process
  1. Note 1: The discursive parts are the concepts coming from the included papers as a result of maximum variation sampling
  2. Note 2: The bold parts are new findings resulting from maximum variation sampling