Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 6 Differences in educational level and health literacya

From: Exploring how individuals complete the choice tasks in a discrete choice experiment: an interview study

  Rotavirus cohort Prostate cancer-screening cohort
  Educational level (n = 35)b Educational level (n = 35)b
  Lower (%) Higher (%) Lower (%) Higher (%)
Including three or more attributes when motivating decisions 81.3 100.0 70.6 83.3
Trading off attribute levels as a strategy to make a decision 56.3 73.7 35.3 44.4
Right explanation of vaccine effectiveness 12.5 26.3 - -
Right explanation of severe side effects 56.3 94.7 - -
Right explanation of unnecessary treatments - - 11.8 22.2
Right answer to control question on vaccine effectiveness 18.8 52.6 - -
Right answer to control question on severe side effects 87.5 100.0 - -
Right answer to control question on unnecessary treatments - - 82.4 94.4
    Health literacy (n = 34)c
    Low (%) High (%)
Including three or more attributes when motivating decisions    80.0 73.7
Trading off attribute levels to make a decision    33.3 47.4
Right explanation of unnecessary treatments    6.7 21.1
Right answer to control question on unnecessary treatments    80.0 94.7
    Combined measure (n = 20)d
    Low (%) High (%)
Including three or more attributes when motivating decisions    77.8 81.8
Trading off attribute levels to make a decision    33.3 54.5
Right explanation of unnecessary treatments    0.0 18.2
Right answer to control question on unnecessary treatments    77.8 100.0
Perceived it as difficult to trade off >2 attributes    60.0 33.3
  1. aDifferences in health literacy could only be calculated for the prostate cancer-screening cohort, because 100 % of the participants in the rotavirus cohort had high objective health literacy scores. bEducational level was dichotomized into a higher and a lower educational level, whereby a Bachelor’s and/or Master’s degree were defined as a higher educational level and all other educational levels were defined as a lower educational level. cHigh subjective score includes participants with a score >2 on the SBSQ-D. High objective score includes participants with a score of 4–6 on the NVS-D. dIndividuals that scored low on both educational level and objective health literacy (n = 9) or scored high on both educational level and objective health literacy (n = 11)